The Hy-Niall Septs of Ulster, Meath, and Connaught - Irish Pedigrees

The Septs called the “Hy-Niall”[1] were descended from Niall of the Nine Hostages, the 126th Monarch of Ireland, who (see page 371) is No. 87 on the “O’Neill” (Princes of Tyrone) pedigree. This Niall was son of Eochy Moyvane, who was the 124th Monarch:

86. Eochy Moyvane, the 124th Monarch of Ireland.

The foregoing were the more important descendants of Eochy Moyvane: (a) Brian, the eldest son, was the first king of his sept in Connaught, and was the ancestor of the O’Connors, Kings of that province; of the MacDermotts of Moylurg, an ancient territory in Roscommon; of the O’Flahertys of West Galway; the O’Rourkes of West Brefney; the O’Reillys of East Brefney, etc. (b) Olioll’s descendants settled in Sligo: from him the district in which they settled got the name Tir Olliolla, corrupted to “Tirerill”—at present the name of a barony in that county. (c) Fiachra’s[2] descendants gave their name to Tir-Fiachra, now the barony of “Tireragh,” also in the county Sligo; and possessed the present baronies of Carra, Erris, and Tyrawley, in the county Mayo. (d) Niall of the Nine Hostages, a quo the “Hy-Niall.” (e) Dathi was the last Pagan Monarch of Ireland. His name was Feredach, but he got the appellation of “Dathi” or “Dathe,” which signifies agility; because he was so expert in the use of his arms and handling his weapons, that, if attacked by a hundred persons at the same time—all discharging their arrows and javeline at him, he would ward off every weapon by his dexterity. Like his uncle, Niall of the Nine Hostages, Dathi made war on the Romans in Gaul and Britain; and, on his last expedition to Gaul, was there killed, some say by lightning, at the foot of the Alps. His body was brought to Ireland by his soldiers, and buried in Reilig na Righ (or the “Cemetery of the Kings)”—the burial place of the Pagan kings of Connaught; as Brugh Boine (or the “Fortress of the Boyne”), in Meath, was the great cemetery of the Pagan kings of Tara. (g) Amhalgaidh or Awly, brother of Dathi, was king of Connaught; and gave his name to Tir-Amhalgaidh, i.e. Awly’s district, now the barony of “Tyrawley,” in the county Mayo. (h) Fiachra Ealgach, son of Dathi, gave his name to Tir-Fiachra, now “Tireragh,” in the county S1igo.

(c) Fiachra, above mentioned, son of the Monarch Eochy Moyvane, had five sons—I. Earc Cuilbhuide; II. Breasal; III. Conaire; IV. Dathi; V. Amhalgaidh [Awly]; and his descendants possessed the barony of Tireragh in the county Sligo; the baronies of Tyrawley, Erris, and Carra, in the county Mayo; Gort, Killovyeragh (a name applied to the north-western portion of the barony of Kiltartan) and Kilmacduagh, in the co. Galway; and Hy-Brecon, in the county Meath; “together with other territories not considered as of the Hy-Fiachrach at the present day.” The townlands or territories possessed by each tribe of this race are mentioned by Dr. O’Donovan in his Tribes and Customs of Hy-Fiachrach—a copy of which work is deposited in the Library of the Royal Irish Academy, Dublin. Among the families of this Hy-Fiachrach were the following— the pedigrees of some of which will be elsewhere found in these Volumes:

The Name.

Anglicised.

Clann Fhearghus

Fergus.

Mac an Bbainbh

Hogg, Hogge, Banff.

Mac Anluain

Ganly.

Mac Cailleachain

Keelehan, Coward, Keelan, MacCallin.

Mac Cale[3]

Mac Ciochain (cioch: Irish, a woman’s breast),

Keeghan, Keegan, Cockane.

Mac Carrain

Currin, Curran.

Mac Coinin

Cunniam, Cunnion, Canning.

Mac Concathraigh

MacCarrick.

Mac Conghaola

Conneely.

Mac Conleitrech

now obsolete.

Mac Conluain

Conlan, Colwan.

Mac Cuinn

Macken.

Mac Eoghain

MacOwen, and MacKeon.

Mac Firbis

Firbis, Forbes.

MagFhiachra

McKeighry, Keary, and Carey.

Mag Fhionnain (pronounced “MaGionnain”)

Gannon, Ginnane.

Mag Flannagain

Flannagan.

Mac Gilla Chaise

Kilcash, Cash.

Mac Gilli-Bhain

White, Bean, Gilwaine.

Mac Gilli-Bhuidh

MacAvee, Kilboy, Gilboy, etc.

Mac Gillifin

Gilfin, Gilpin, Gill.

Mac Gillimir

Gilmer, Gillmor.

Mac Gilli-Riabhaigh

Kilrea, MacIlrea, Gray.

Mac Giolla

Gill, Magill.

Mac Giolla Fhalain

Phelan.

Mac Gilli Bricin

Brickin.

Mac Giolla-Ceallaigh

Kilkelly, Killikelly.

Mac Giolla-Duibh

Gilduff, Kilduff.

Mag Lannagain

Lanigan.

Mac Neill

MacNeil.

Mag Odhrain

Magoran, Orum, Orme.

Mag Rodain

Grayden, Roden.

Muintir Ubain

Hoban.

O’Aodha,[4]

in the county Mayo, is generally anglicised Hughes.

O’Airmeadhaigh

Armedy, Armidage, Armitage, Armytage.

O’Baethghaile

O’Boyle, Beahilly, Beatley, Beale.

O’Banain

Bannan, Bannon.

O’Beollain

Boland.

O’Bearga

Begar, Biggar, Bera.

O’Birn

Brin, Bruen.

O’Blighe

Blighe.

O’Broduibh

Brodiff, Brodie, Brody.

O’Brislain

Brislane, Breslin.

O’Brogain

Brogan.

O’Caemhagain

Kevigan.

O’Caithniadh

Catny, Kane.

O’Camdhain

Camden, Caden.

O’Caomhain

Keveny, Kevin, Kavanagh, Cowen, Cohen.

O’Cathain

Keane, Kane, Kyan, and O’Keane.

O’Cathasaigh

Casey.

O’Cathniadh

Kane.

O’Ceallachain

Callaghan, of Erris.

O’Ceallaigh

Kelly.

O’Cearnaigh

Kearney, Carney.

O’Ceirin

Kearn, Kerins.

O’Chobhthaigh

Coffey, Coffee.

O’Chosgraidh

Cosgrave.

O’Ciaragain

Kerrigan

O’Ciardha

Keary.

O’Cinnchnamha

Kinnavy, Bones.

O’Cobhthaigh

Coffey, Cowhig.

O’Coiglidh

Quigley.

O’Coitil

Cottle.

O’Columain

Coleman.

O’Comhghain

Cowgan, Coogan.

O’Conbhuidhe

Conway, Convy.

O’Conboirne

Bourns, Burns.

O’Congadhain, and O’Connaghain

Cunnigan, Cunningham, and Conway.

O’Conghaile

Connolly, Cunneely.

O’Connachtain

Connaughtan, Conattan.

O’Creachain

Crehan, Greghan, Grehan, Graham.

O’Criadhen

Creedan.

O’Cuaghain

Gough.

O’Cuain

Quan, Quaine, Coyne.

O’Cuanain

Quinan, Coonan.

O’Cuimin

Cummin, Cummins.

O’Cuinn

Quinn.

O’Colaghain

Coolahan, Coolacan.

O’Deirg

Derrig, Durrig, Derrick.

O’Discin

Dixon.

O’Donchadha

Donoghue, Donaghy, Dunphy.

O’Dorcbaidhe

Dorcy, Dorcey, Dorsey, Darcy, D’Arcy (of the county Galway), Darkey.

O’Duanmhaigh

Duany, Devany.

O’Dubhda

O’Dowda.

O’Duibhagain

Duvegan, Dugan, Duggan.

O’Duibhleargain

Dulleran.

O’Duibhscuile

Duscully, Scully.

O’Duinchinn

Dunkin.

O’Dunghaile

Donnelly.

O’Faghartaigh

Faherty.

O’Feinneadha

Feeny.

O’Fionnaghain

Finnegan.

O’Fionain

O’Finan, Finan.

O’Flaitile

Flatly, Flatilly, Flattery.

O’Flannabhra

Flannery.

O’Flannghaile

Flannelly.

O’Floinn

Flynn.

O’Fuala

Foley.

O’Fualairg

Fowler, Fuller.

O’Fhuathmharain

Farran, Heverine.

O’Gadain

Goddan, Godwin, Goodwin.

O’Gaibhtheachain

Gaughan, Gahan.

O’Gealigain

Galligan, Gealan.

O’Gearadhain

Gearan, Geyrins.

O’Gilin

Killin, Killeen, Culleen.

O’Gloinin

Glennon, Gloin, Glinn.

O’Goirmghiallaigh[5]

Gormilly, Gormley, Grimley.

O’Gormghail

Gorman.

O’Gormog

Gorman.

O’h-Arain

Haran.

O’h-Eana

Heany.

O’h-Eidhin

O’Heyne, Hynes, etc.

O’h-Eidhneachain

Heanaghan.

O’h-Enda

Henn.

O’h-Eimhirin

Herne.

O’h-Fhuadha

Foody, Swift.

O’h-Emeachain

Hemans, Meehan.

O’h-Iarnain

Hernon.

O’h-Iomhair

Howard, Ivers, Ivor.

O’h-Oilmhec

Helvick, Helwick.

O’h Oireachtaigh

Heraghty, Geraghty.

O’h Uathmharain

Hamran, Horan, Heverine.

O’Lachtnain

Loughnane, Loftns.

O’Laechaille

Leech, Lilly.

O’Laitile

Little, Lyttle.

O’Laighdiachain

Lydican.

O’Leannain

Lannen, Lennon, Leonard.

OLearghusa

Larriey, Leasy.

O’Liathain

Lyons, Lee.

O’Luachaim

Luxom.

O’Luachain

Price.

O’Luachduibh

Loody, Luddy.

O’Luachair

Rushe.

O’Loingseachain

Lunshekaun.

O’Loingsigh

Lynskey, MaGloinsg, Lynch.

O’Maghnain

Magnan.

O’Mailina

Mallin.

O’Mainnin

Mannion.

O’Maoilaithin

Mullattin, Molohan.

O’Maoilbhrenain

Mulrennan.

O’Maoilcana

Malcan, Singer.

O’Maoilduin

Muldoon.

O’Maoilchluiche

Gamble, Stone, Stoney.

O’Maoilchonaire

Mulconry, Connery, Conroy, Conry.

O’Maoilfaghmhair

Milford, Fayre.

O’Maoilfhiona[6]

Molina.

O’Maoilraite

Mulratty, Ratten, Rait, Malet.

O’Maoilruaidh

Mulroy, Roy.

O’Maoilruain

Mulroyne.

O’Maoinaigh

Meeny, Mooney.

O’Maonagh

Moynagh.

O’Marcachain

Markam, Rider, Horseman.

O’Mochain

Moghan, Mohan.

O’Mongain

Mangan, Mongan, Mungan.

O’Morain

Moran, Morrin.

O’Muimhneachain

Minahan, Mynahan, Meenehan.

O’Muireadhaigh

Murray.

O’Muirgheasa

Morrisy, Morris, Morrison.

O’Murchada

Murphy.

O’Nuadhain

Nuane, Noone, Noonan.

O’Rabhartaigh

Rafferty.

O’Radubhain

Radwin.

O’Riagain

Regan.

O’Radubhain

Radavan, Radden.

O’Ronain

Ronan, in Connaught; and Ronayne, in Munster.

O’Rothlain

Rolan, Roland, Rowlan, Rowley, Rollan, Rollin.

O’Ruadhain

Ruane, Rowan.

O’Ruadhraigh

Rogers.

O’Scannail

Scanlan.

O’Seachnasaigh

O’Shaughnessy.

O’Seghdha

Shaw, Hawk, Shea.

O’Sionna

Fox, Seeny.

O’Spealain

Spillaan, Spillaine.

O’Suanaigh

Sunagh, Swanny.

O’Tarpaigh

Tarpy, Torpy.

O’Teagha

Teague, Tighe.

O'Tighearnaigh

Tierney.

O’Tighearnain

Tiernan.

O’Toghdha

Toffey, Todd.

O’Tuathalain

Tolan, Toland.

Of the foregoing families, the following were located in Erris: O’Ceallachain, O’Cathniadh, MacCoinin, O’Muimhneachain, Mag-Fhionain, O’Conboirne, O’Fionnaghain, O’Gearadhain, etc. The O’Muireadhaigh[7] were chieftains of the Lagan; and among the people of Doonfeeny were O’Cuinn, Mag-Odhrain, O’Camdhain, O’Bearga, O’Blighe, O’Duanmhaigh, O’Congaile, O’Cathasaigh, O’Duibhlearga. About Rathlacken were the families of O’Deirg, O’h-Aodha, O’Flannabhra, O’Maoilconaire, OTeagha, etc. O’Cuimin, at Kilcommon (near Ballycastle, Mayo); O’Lachtna or O’Lachtnain, were chiefs of the two Bacs and of Glen Nephin; MacConlena, of Kilmore Moy; Clan Firbis, of Rosserk, and afterwards of Leacan, near Enniscrone. The tribes of Breudach (a territory nearly co-extensive with the parish of Moygawnagh) were O’Connaghain (anglicised “Conway”), O’Toghdha, O’Glaimin, O’Luachaibh (sometimes written O’Luachaim, O’Gilin, O’Learghusa, etc. Of the parish of Crossmolina, O’Maoilfhiona, O’Gaibhtheachain, and O’Floinn were the chiefs: O’Floinn being the chief of Errew of Logh Conn, and brughaidh of Magh h-Eleog (the level part of the parish of Crossmolina, through which the river Deel flows). O’Maoilruaidh was chief of Ardagh and Cill Ealadh. From Rosserk to Rathfran the tribes were O’Maoilfaghmhair, O’Leannain, O’Criadhen, O’Laithile, O’Mochain, O’Broduibh, O’Maoilbhrenainn, etc.

In the barony of Tireragh, O’Morain was hereditary proprietor of Ardnaree; O’Brogain of Breafy: and the chiefs of Coolcarney were O’Fionain, O’Rothlain, O’h-Iarnain (or O’Tuathalain), O’Cuinn, O’Eana, O’Gealagain, O’Brislain, etc.

O’Caomhain’s chief seat was Saidhin Uisge tar abhainn, which is otherwise called Inis Sgreabhainn, now “Enniscrone,” in the county Sligo, near Beal atha an fheadha (os vadi sylvæ), now the town of “Ballina,” in the county Mayo. And the tribes of O’Caomhain were—MacCailleachain of Carn, O’Coitil, O’Floinn of Bartra and Muckduff, O’Mochaine of Ballymoghan, O’Iomhair of Leacan (before MacFirbis went there), O’Loingseachain of Mullach Ratha, O’Spealain of Coillin, O’Fualairg of Rath Berchain, and O’Connachtain of Cabrach, etc. Of the tract from the river Gleoir to Easky, the tribes were—O’Murchada, O’Maolduin, O’Ruadhraigh, O’Fenneadha, O’Flannghaile, O’Luachain, O’Duibhscuile, O’Rothlain, O’Maonagh, O’Beollain, O’Conbhuidhe, MacEoghain, O’Cuanain, O’Discin, O’Dunghaile, O’Suidhlearga, O’Cuain, O’Columain, O’Fuala, O’Ceallaigh, O’Loingsigh, O’Caomhain, MacGiolla, MacGiolla Duibh, O’Sionna, etc. And “the pillars of Skreen” were MacConcathrach, O’h-Oilmhec, Mag Rodain, O’Sneadharna, O’Rabhartaigh, MacCarrain, O’Tarpaigh, etc.

(d) Niall of the Nine Hostages had twelve (some say fourteen) sons, of whom eight left issue, who are in the ancient Irish Annals set down in the following order:

  1. Laeghaire (or Leary), who succeeded his father in the Monarchy, from A.D. 428 to 458. This Leary was the 128th Milesian Monarch of Ireland.
  2. Conall Crimthaine (or Crimthann) was the first King of that sept in the Kingdom of Meath.
  3. Fiacha.
  4. Maine: These four sons and their descendants settled in ancient Meath; and the next four sons and their descendants settled in Ulster.
  5. Eoghan (Owen, or Eugenius) was King of Aileach[8] (Ely). His descendants, who were called the “Clan Owen,” afterwards possessed the territory extending over the counties of Tyrone and Londonderry, and the two baronies of Raphoe and Inishowen in Donegal: all this district was called Tir-Owen or Owen’s Country, which is now written Tyrone, and restricted to one county. The peninsula between Lough Foyle and Lough Swilly took its name from Owen; namely, Inishowen, i.e. Owen’s Island. Owen’s descendants were also called the “Cineal-Owen.”
  6. Conall Gulban (or Gulbin), whose posterity was called the “Cineal-Connell,”[9] derived his cognomen “Gulbin” from having been fostered near the mountain Ben Gulbin (Gulbins Peak), in the county Sligo. His posterity ultimately possessed nearly the whole of the county Donegal; which from them was called Tir-Connell, i.e. Connall’s district or territory. Of the descendants of Conall Gulbin, there were ten Ard Righs or Monarchs up to the Anglo-Norman invasion. After the establishment of sirnames, there were settled in Tir-Connell the leading families of O’Muldorys,[10] O’Canannans, O’Donnells, O’Boyles, O’Gallaghers, O’Dohertys, etc., all of the race of Conall Gulbin.
  7. Cairbre, whose descendants gave their name to the territory in the county Sligo, now known as the barony of “Carbery.”
  8. Enna Finn, whose descendants settled in the territory, which included the present barony of Raphoe, in the county Donegal.

The southern Hy-Niall were, as already stated, those who settled in the kingdom of Meath; and the northern Hy-Niall, those who settled in Ulster. The dominant Hy-Niall of Ulster were the MacLoghlins, O’Donnells, O’Loghlins, and O’Neills; of Meath, the “O’Melaghlins.”

The ancestor of O’Donnell, was, as we saw, Donal, grandson of Dalach, who died, A.D. 868; and from whom they were sometimes called the “Clan Dalach.” That Dalach and Eighnecan [Enekan] who died A.D. 901, were the first Princes of Tirconnell. The Enekan O’Donnell, who reigned from A.D.1200 to 1207, was however, the first Prince from whose accession to power Tirconnell may be considered the country of “The O’ Donnell.”[11]

Notes

[1] Hy-Niall: There were other Hy-Niall Septs in Ireland.—See Note under the “O’Neill” (No. 1) pedigree, p 708, Vol. I.

[2] Fiachra: This Fiachra’s descendants, called “Hy-Fiachrach,” are to be distinguished from the “Hy-Fiachrach Fionn Arda Stratha,” who were seated along the river Dearg, in the north west of the county Tyrone, and whose district comprised the parish of Ardstraw and some adjoining parishes now belonging to the see of Derry. The “Hy-Fiachrach” of Ardstraw were of the Clan-Colla—descended from Fiachra, son of Earc, the grandson of Colla-Uais, the 121st Monarch of Ireland—Book of Rights.

[3] MacHale: “This,” says Dr. O’Donovan, “is probably the family name now called MacHale.” (See the “MacHale” pedigree, p. 541, Vol. I.)

[4] O’Aodha: In Connaught since the Cromwellian Settlement of Ireland, the prefix O’ has been omitted by most of the natives of that province. The Milesian gentry, there, however, still use that prefix as a mark of distinction between themselves and their co-relatives, the peasantry of the same race.—Dr. O’Donovan.

[5] O’Goirmghiallaigh: This Connaught family is distinct from the O’Gairmleadhaigh (or Gormley) family of Ulster.

[6] O’Maoilfhiona: The once strong castle which stood at Cros-Ui-Maoilfhiona, now, the town of “Crossmolina,” on the banks of the river Deel, in the barony of Tyrawley and county of Mayo, belonged to this family. To the writer of these lines that town is endeared by many early associations: it was the home of his childhood; and that old castle and its surroundings were to him in his innocent rambles the scene of many of his childish sports and pastimes. This O’Molina family was of the posterity of Cuan Mór, eighth in descent from Fiachra, son of Eochy Moyvane, the 124th Monarch of Ireland. Until the English invaders came into Ireland, O’Molina, O’Gaughan, and O’Flynn were the three families who were chiefs of the district of Calraighe Muigh-h-Eleog, a territory which was co-extensive with the level portion of the parish of Crossmolina; O’Flynn being the chief of Errew of Loch Conn. As a tribute of affection for our native home we have here collected the names of all the families of this Hy-Fiachrach race, which are not extinct; but it will be seen that among those Irish families are sirnames which are also found in other parts of Ireland, and of a different race.

[7] O’Muireadhaigh: There was another family of this name in the barony of Carra, in the county Mayo; and another in the county Roscommon, etc.

[8] Aileach: Greenan Ely (or the Palace of Aileach) was a fort in the county Donegal, near Lough Swilly, situated on the isthmus dividing it from Lough Foyle, in the barony of Inishowen. Donal, prince of Aileach, and the 179th Monarch of Ireland, having a A.D. 1088, marched against King Murkertagh O’Brien, the 180th Monarch, and destroyed his famous family residence at Kincora, the latter, A.D. 1101, avenged this injury upon “Aileach, among the oak forests immeasurable;” ordering that for every sack of provisions in his army, a stone from this great northern edifice should be carried away to the south.

Such, after an existence extending beyond the dawn of history, was the fate of Aileach; from which its possessor was, in old writings, designated—“King of Aileach of the spacious house—of the vast tribute—of the high decisions—of the ready ships—of the armed battalions—of the grand bridles—the Prince of Aileach who protects all—the mighty-deeded, noble King of Aileach.”—O’Callaghan.

[9] Cineal Connell: From the early ages of Christianity in Ireland, there were handed down among her leading races certain memorials of the saints whom they most venerated; respecting which memorials there were predictions that connected the future destinies of those tribes, for good or for evil, with the preservation, or loss by them, of such local palladiums. That of the Cineal-Connell consisted of a portable square box, of several metals, variously ornamented and gemmed, and containing in a small wooden case a “Latin Psalter” believed to have been written by the hand of him who was the most eminent ecclesiastic and great religious Patron of their race—the famous St. Columba or Columbkille, who flourished from A.D. 521 to 597; was the Apostle of the northern Picts; and the Founder of the celebrated monastery in Hye or Iona, in Scotland, through which, in the language of Dr. Johnson, it became—

“That illustrious island, once the luminary of the Caledonian regions, whence savage clans and roving barbarians, derived the benefits of knowledge and the blessings of religion.”

The venerated reliquary here mentioned was styled the “Cathach [caha] of Saint Columbkille,” from the persuasion entertained and handed down by tradition, that it was a kind of spiritual talisman which would procure victory for the forces of Tirconnell, if conveyed with, and accompanied by, a certain ceremonial among them, previous to their giving battle; and it was usually borne to the field, with the banner of the Cineal-Connell. On that subject Manus O’Donnell, the last king or prince of Tir-Connell, in his life of St. Columbkille, written about the year A.D. 1532, says:

“Et Cathach, id est præliator, vulgo appellatur, fertque traditio, quod si circa illius exercitum antequam hostem adoriantur, tertio cum debita reverentia circumducatur, eveniat ut victoriam reportet.”

In Scotland, too, we find, in the tenth century, the crozier of that Irish saint, as her Apostle, borne for a standard, under the designation of the “cathbhuaidh” [cabua] or “battle victory,” against the Heathen Norsemen.

The box containing that relic came into the possession of the late Sir Neal O’Donnell, Bart, Newport-Mayo, who believed himself to be “The O’Donnell;” and was subsequently intrusted by Sir Richard O’Donnell to the care of the Royal Irish Academy, Dublin, as a National Antiquity of religious veneration to the Northern Hy-Niall.—O’Callaghan.

[10] O’Muldory: At the time of the introduction of sirnames into Ireland, the O’Muldorys (anglicised Mulroys) were princes of Tirconnell. It was they who then had charge of the “Cathach” of St. Columbkille above alluded to, before it came into the possession of the O’Donnell’s.—Book of Rights.

[11] The O’Donnell: According to Keating’s History of Ireland, the ceremony of inaugurating the kings of Tirconnell was as follows: “The king, being seated on an eminence, and surrounded by the nobility and gentry of his own country, one of the chief of his nobles stood before him, with a straight white wand in his hand, and, on presenting it to the King of Tirconnell, used to desire him to “receive the sovereignty of his country, and to preserve equal and impartial justice in every part of his dominions.” The reason that the wand was straight and white was to put him in mind that he should be unbiassed in his judgment, and pure and upright in all his actions.

“The heads of this great name,” writes O’Callaghan, “as the first native potentates of the north-west of Ireland, were regarded with suitable consideration in other countries, as well as in their own; being entitled and treated according to the designation of princes, chiefs, and lords of Tirconnell, by the Kings of England, Scotland, France, and Spain, up to the 17th century.” The fact that Henry O’Donnell, a descendant of the O’Donnell, of Tirconnell, was, A.D. 1754, with the consent of Maria Theresa, Empress of Austria, married to her cousin, is a sufficient evidence of the high consideration with which, on account of his pedigree, he was regarded in Austria,— the Court that has claimed a succession to the ancient majesty of the Cæsars. Roderick O’Donnell, the last chief or prince of his name, was, by James the First, A.D. 1603, created Earl of Tirconnell, with the title during his own lifetime, for his eldest son, of Baron of Donegal.

The ancient tribe-name of the family of O’Domhnaill [O’Donnell] was “Cineal Lughdhach,” i.e. the race of Lughach, grandson of Sedna, who was the grandson of Conall Gulbin; and their territory extended from the stream of Dobhar to the river Suilidhe [Swilly].—Book of Rights.

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