CARRICKFERGUS CASTLE

From Atlas and Cyclopedia of Ireland (1900)

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Description of County Antrim | Carrick-A-Rede | Antrim Round Tower | Giant's Causeway | Glenarm Castle | Dunluce Castle | Shane's Castle | Carrickfergus Castle | Portrush | Albert Memorial, Belfast | St. Patrick's Cathedral, Belfast | Antrim Map

CARRICKFERGUS.—Carrickfergus is said to have derived its name from Feargusa, or Fergus, who was lost off the coast of the locality before the birth of Christ. Among the many historical reminders of this place is the castle, which is, perhaps, the only one of the very ancient castles at present in a habitable condition. Situated on an insulated rock, jutting out into the bay, it commands the approach to the opulent city of Belfast, and as a military position has been always regarded as of much importance. At a very early period it was selected as the site of a fortress, being one of the most celebrated of the military posts in the time of the Dalaradians, and ever since it has occupied a prominent position in the annals of the country. The castle was built by the celebrated John De Courcy, in 1178, who received a "grant" from Henry II. of all the land he might conquer in Ulster. Carrickfergus remained as the great stronghold of the English for centuries. In 1641, it frequently changed masters, being alternately in the hands of the Scotch, English and Irish.

Carrickfergus Castle, County Antrim

Description of County Antrim | Carrick-A-Rede | Antrim Round Tower | Giant's Causeway | Glenarm Castle | Dunluce Castle | Shane's Castle | Carrickfergus Castle | Portrush | Albert Memorial, Belfast | St. Patrick's Cathedral, Belfast | Antrim Map

« Introduction | Book Contents | County Armagh »


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