MacCARTHY DUNA (No.8)

Or MacCarthy Dooney

From Irish Pedigrees; or the Origin and Stem of the Irish Nation by John O'Hart

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Line of Heber | Heber Genealogies

Armorial Bearings: Same as those of "MacCarthy Glas."

THIS Family was descended from Tadhg-an-Duna, who is No. 122 on the "MacCarthy Glas" Stem.

123. Tadhg an-Fhorsa (2): eldest son of Tadhg an Duna; was living at Togher Castle, in 1641. Married, on the 22nd October, 1641, Gennet Coppinger, the widow of Nicholas Skiddy of Cork, by whom she had one son. This Tadhg died in 1650; he possessed in fee the town and lands of Fearlaghan, known by the names of Tullagh Glas, Gortnidihy, Maulcullanane, and Carrigatotane, in the parish of Kilmeen, barony of Carbery, co. Cork; and the town and lands of Curryboy, Coolmontane and Tullagh, lands in Inchigeela. Those possessions were seized on by English adventurers and his widow and son expelled therefrom.

124. Tadhg an Duna (2): only son of Tadhg an-Fhorsa (2); known as "Nominal lord of Glean na-Croim;" was only eight years old on the death of his father, who secured the possessions by obtaining a "Decree of Innocence," so that although the lands of Togher were confiscated after the war of 1641-52, those of Dunmanway were then saved. But, after the 3rd of October, 1691, in conformity with the terms of the "Violated Treaty" of Limerick, Tadhg's patrimony was seized by the Williamites, so that in 1696, he died situated as the National Poet describes:—

"Ni Tadhg an-Duna d'ainim!

"Acht Tadhg gan dun, gan daingean;

"Tadhg gan bó, gan capall,

"I m-bothainin isiol deataigh,

"Tadhg gan bean gan leanbh!" etc.

Interpreted:

Not Teige of the Dunthy name!

But Teige without Dun, without Daingean;

Teige without cow, without horse,

In a low smoky cabin—

Teige without wife, without child! &c.

And again:

"Crioch a bheatha sa marbh a aonar (an aovacht),

quot;A n-aras cumhang a luib chnuic sleibhe."

Interpreted:

The end of his life, and death together,

In a narrow dwelling in the curved ridge of a mountain.

This exactly describes the fate of the last lord of Glean-na-Croim. Married Honora, dau. of Donal O'Donovan, lord of Clancahill. Tadhg left issue two sons; one, it seems was of weak intellect, and "no better than no son at all."

125. "Captain Jacques (James) MacCarthy Duna or Dooney: his son; an officer in the service of France, of whose fate we learn that he fought and fell at Landen, 1693. We know not whether he had issue.

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Line of Heber | Heber Genealogies

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