The Last Conquest of Ireland (Perhaps)

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CHAPTER I.

INTRODUCTION—ADDRESS OF THE AMERICAN CONGRESS "TO THE PEOPLE OF IRELAND," IN 1775—STATISTICS AND CONDITION OF IRELAND—IRELAND IN 1843—O'CONNELL—THE REPEAL DEBATE IN THE CORPORATION OF DUBLIN—THE "MONSTER MEETINGS" IN 1843—OPINION IN THE ENGLISH PARLIAMENT—SIR ROBERT PEEL'S DECLARATION IN ANSWER TO MR BERNAL [OSBORNE].

"We are desirous of possessing the good opinion of the virtuous and humane. We are peculiarly desirous of furnishing you with the true state of our motives and objects; the better to enable you to judge of our conduct with accuracy and determine the merits of the controversy with impartiality and precision."

These sentences are taken from the "Address to the People of Ireland," by the Continental Congress of America, adopted July, 1775. They fit the other side at present. The Irish People are now the pleaders and appellants. Americans are the virtuous and humane.

In the same Address, Congress was pleased to say to the People of Ireland:

"Your Parliament had done us no wrong. You had ever been friendly to the rights of mankind; and we acknowledge with pleasure and gratitude that your nation has produced patriots who have nobly distinguished themselves in the cause of humanity and America."

Ireland, at that time, had a Parliament, and national existence; and her voice counted for something among civilized nations. And Americans, at that time, would have been very unwilling that the civilized world should form its ideas of their rights, wrongs, and resistance from the British Press; but their eventual success set them quite above that apprehension; for the civilized world "sympathizes" with success. Ireland, on ...continue reading »

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Page 7

The Last Conquest of Ireland (Perhaps)

by John Mitchel


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