TAGHADOE

From A Topographical Dictionary of Ireland, 1837

TAGHADOE, or TAPTOO, a parish, in the barony of NORTH SALT, county of KILDARE, and province of LEINSTER, 1 ½ mile (S. by W.) from Maynooth, on the road to Naas; containing 467 inhabitants. This parish is situated between the Grand and Royal canals, and comprises 3788 statute acres, as applotted under the tithe act, partly under tillage, but chiefly in pasture. Before the Reformation it formed part of the possessions of the monastery of All Hallows, Dublin; the advowson was granted, at the suppression, to the corporation of Dublin.

The living is a rectory and vicarage, in the diocese of Dublin, and in the patronage of the corporation: the tithes amount to £220. There are 12 acres of glebe. The church is a small neat building, with octagonal turrets rising from square piers at the angles, and was erected in 1831 by aid of a gift of £830 from the late Board of First Fruits.

In the R. C. divisions the parish is part of the union or district of Maynooth: the chapel is in ruins. Near the church is an ancient round tower, about 60 feet high; its external diameter is much larger than is usual in similar structures.

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