FEDAMORE

From A Topographical Dictionary of Ireland, 1837

FEDAMORE, a parish, partly in the barony of CLANWILLIAM, but chiefly in that of SMALL COUNTY, county of LIMERICK, and province of MUNSTER, 6 miles (S.) from Limerick, on the road to Bruff; containing 3420 inhabitants, of which number, 277 are in the village. This parish comprises 5958 statute acres, as applotted under the tithe act, and valued at £7964 per annum. The soil is remarkably fertile; about one-fourth of the land is under tillage, and the remainder, with the exception of about 800 acres of valuable bog, is good pasture and meadow land. The meadows are subject to inundation from the river Commogue, and sometimes the crops of hay are entirely swept away.

The neighbourhood is highly interesting, and embellished with several gentlemen's seats, of which the principal are Ballyneguard, that of J. Croker, Esq., a handsome mansion in a well-wooded and richly varied demesne of 700 plantation acres; Sandville, of J. Barry, Esq.; Grange, of H. O'Grady, Esq.; Friarstown, the ancient residence of the Hunt family; and the Glebe-house, of the Rev. J. Bennett. The village contains 26 houses. Fairs are held here on May 5th and Oct. 9th, chiefly for cattle and pigs, and occasionally for horses; and there is a constabulary police station.

The living is a vicarage, in the diocese of Limerick, united at an unknown period to the vicarage of Glenogra, and in the patronage of the Bishop; the rectory is appropriate to the vicars choral of the cathedral of Christ-Church, Dublin. The tithes amount to £553.16. 11., of which £369.4.7 ½. is payable to the lessees of the appropriators, and the remainder to the vicar: the tithes of the benefice amount to £379. 11. 3 ½. The glebe-house was built by aid of a gift of £300 and a loan of £500 from the late Board of First Fruits, in 1816; there are six acres of glebe attached to it, and there are also two other small glebes in the parish. The church is a small ancient edifice.

In the R. C. divisions the parish is the head of a union or district, comprising also the parishes of Ballycahane, Manister-Nenagh, and Kilpeacon, in which are two chapels; the chapel at this place is a large and handsome edifice, which cost £700. About 200 children are taught in two public schools, of which the parochial school is endowed with half an acre of land from the glebe, on which it is situated. A residence for the master was built at the expense of the Rev. Godfrey Massey, then curate of the parish. The other school, at Grange, is liberally supported by H. O'Grady, Esq., who built the school-house. At Fanningstown, near the northern boundary of the parish, are the remains of Temple Roe, a church erected by the Knights Templars in 1288.

Adjoining the demesne of Ballyneguard is Rockstown Castle; and in it is Williamstown Castle, erected by the Bourke family, a plain square building in its exterior, but curiously fitted up internally in the Gothic style; it has been renovated and restored to its ancient appearance by the Messrs. Pain, architects. At English-town is another castle, built by Sir J. Fitzgerald.

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