CASTLE-GREGORY, a town

From A Topographical Dictionary of Ireland, 1837

CASTLE-GREGORY, a town, in the parish of KILLEINY, barony of CORKAGUINEY, county of KERRY, and province of MUNSTER, 12 miles (W.) from Tralee; containing 970 inhabitants. This town, which is situated on the Connor Hill road from Tralee to Dingle, and on the southern coast of Tralee bay, derives its name from an ancient castle founded by Gregory Hussey, which, in the war of 1641, was garrisoned for the king by its then proprietor, Walter Hussey. After sustaining a protracted assault from Cromwell's forces, the garrison, with their commander, escaped by night to Minard Castle, in the neighbourhood, in which they were besieged by Cols. Le Hunt and Sadler, and blown up by gunpowder laid under the vaults of the castle; there are no remains of this fortress. The town contains 160 houses, the greater number of which are thatched. A patron fair is held on Aug. 15th, which is also a fair for cattle. It is in contemplation to establish a penny post from Tralee and Dingle. A constabulary police force and a coastguard have been stationed here; the latter has a detachment at Magharee, and is one of the five stations that constitute the district of Tralee. Petty sessions are held irregularly. The R. C. chapel, a substantial cruciform structure, was erected in 1831; and a school-room is about to be built, the late Rev. T. Fitzgerald, P. P. having bequeathed £30 per annum for educating poor children of the parish.—See KILLEINY.

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