CAHIRCIVEEN, a market and post-town

From A Topographical Dictionary of Ireland, 1837

CAHIRCIVEEN, a market and post-town, in the parish of CAHIR, barony of IVERAGH, county of KERRY, and province of MUNSTER, 36 miles (S. W.) from Tralee, and 183 (S. W. by W.) from Dublin; containing 1192 inhabitants. This town, of which the greater portion has arisen since the formation of the new line of road along the coast of Castlemaine bay and through the Iveragh mountains to Valencia, is pleasantly situated at the base of the Cahirciveen mountain, and on the high road from Tralee to Valencia. In 1815 there were only five houses in the entire village, but within the last ten years it has rapidly increased, and consists of one principal street stretching along the main road, and of two smaller streets branching from it at right angles, one of which leads down to the quay, and the other to the upper road or old village of Cahir, which consists only of mud cabins. The houses on the new road are neatly built and roofed with slate; the town has a lively and cheerful appearance; the approaches are all by good roads kept in excellent order, and great improvements have been made in the neighbourhood. A subscription news-room upon a small scale has been established, also an agency for transacting business with the National Bank of Ireland.

The chief trade carried on is the importation of timber, salt, and iron; oats and flour from some mills to the east of the town are occasionally exported. The flour-mills were erected at an expense exceeding £4000, and from the increasing cultivation of wheat in this district, are now extensively worked. A pier and a small quay were constructed in 1822, which are much used, but would have been more beneficial to the town had they been built a little below the present site; the quay is accessible to vessels of considerable burden. About 400 persons are employed in the fishery, but being also engaged in agriculture they neglect the best seasons for fishing. At Renard Point, immediately opposite to the "foot" of Valencia island, is a small quay, from which is a ferry to Valencia. It is supposed that Renard, which is about 2 ½ miles to the west of Cahirciveen, will be the commencement of the great western railway, should that work be carried into execution. The market is on Saturday; and fairs are held on the 1st of September and 13th of December, besides which, several others have been recently established. A constabulary police force has been stationed here; and petty sessions are held in the town every alternate week. The bridewell is a neat and well-arranged building. The parish church and the R. C. chapel (the latter a handsome building), and a fever hospital and dispensary, are situated in the town. Here is also a national school.—See CAHIR.

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