Thomas Butler, Earl of Ossory

From A Compendium of Irish Biography, 1878

« James Butler, 12th Earl and Duke of Ormond | Index | James Butler, 2nd Duke of Ormond »

Butler, Thomas, Earl of Ossory, son of preceding, was born in Kilkenny Castle, 9th July 1634. In 1647 he quitted Ireland with his father, and passed on eventually to France, where he perfected himself in the accomplishments necessary to a youth of his expectations. In 1653 he accompanied his mother to Ireland. In March 1655, being in London, he was lodged in the Tower; whence he was, after a short imprisonment, released on account of ill health, and permitted to retire to the Continent — "not daring," as his biographer says, "to come near the King as long as Cromwell lived, for fear it should be a pretence for taking away from the Duchess the tenancy of her own estate." In November 1659, he married Emelia Beverweert, daughter of a leading Dutch statesman, a natural son of the Prince of Orange. After the Restoration he was appointed to several commands in the army, and was in 1665 made Lieutenant-General in Ireland. Next year he was sworn on the English Privy Council, and took his seat in Parliament as Lord Butler of Moor-Park. In 1672, visiting the court of France as envoy extraordinary, he was pressed by Louis to enter his service, and at parting was presented with a valuable jewel. In 1673,as Admiral of the Blue, he distinguished himself in an engagement with Van Tromp; and the same year planned a descent on Helvoetsluys, which Charles II. would not permit him to carry into execution. In the ensuing years he occupied several important offices of trust. Five years afterwards (1678) he commanded the British troops in the service of the Prince of Orange, and at the battle of Mons contributed not a little to the defeat of Marshal Luxembourg. He died 1680, aged 46, "to the universal regret of this nation and the general grief of a great part of Europe." His father was thereafter accustomed to say that "he would not exchange his dead son for any living son in Christendom." Mr. Wills writes: "In an age degraded by the vices of Buckingham and Rochester, he ran the race of Sidney, without the reward of royal favour which valour and virtue could win in better times." His body, after resting for a time in Westminster Abbey, was removed to Kilkenny. There is a long disquisition upon his character in Carte's 8th Book.

Sources

196. Irishmen, Lives of Illustrious and Distinguished, Rev. James Wills, D.D. 6 vols. or 12 parts. Dublin, 1840-'7.

271. Ormond, Duke of, Life 1610-'88: Thomas A. Carte, M.A. 6 vols. Oxford, 1851.

« James Butler, 12th Earl and Duke of Ormond | Index | James Butler, 2nd Duke of Ormond »

FEATURED BOOK

Annals of the Irish HarpersAnnals of the Irish Harpers

Charlotte Milligan Fox, sister of the poet Alice Milligan, was a founding member of the Irish Folk Song Society and an indefatigable field collector of Irish traditional music. Her singularly important work on Irish haprers is here presented for the twenty-first century reader. This edition of Annals offers a much greater number of illustrations than were included in the original 1911 publication, a full biographical introduction, an extensive bibliography of the writings of Milligan Fox and an appendix discussing the variant texts of Arthur O’Neills Memoirs.

FEATURED eBOOKS

Annals of the Famine in Ireland

Annals of the Famine in Ireland

Annals of the Famine in Ireland, by Asenath Nicholson, still has the power to shock and sadden even though the events described are ever-receding further into the past. When you read, for example, of the poor widowed mother who was caught trying to salvage a few potatoes from her landlord's field, and what the magistrate discovered in the pot in her cabin, you cannot help but be appalled and distressed.

The ebook is available for download in .mobi (Kindle), .epub (iBooks, etc.) and .pdf formats. For further information on the book and author see details ».

Ireland's Welcome to the Stranger

Ireland's Welcome to the Stranger

This book, the prequel to Annals of the Famine in Ireland cannot be recommended highly enough to those interested in Irish social history. The author, Mrs Asenath Nicholson, travelled from her native America to assess the condition of the poor in Ireland during the mid 1840s. Refusing the luxury of hotels and first class travel, she stayed at a variety of lodging-houses, and even in the crude cabins of the very poorest. Not to be missed!

The ebook is available for download in .mobi (Kindle), .epub (iBooks, etc.) and .pdf formats. For further information on the book and author see details ».

The Scotch-Irish in America

The Scotch-Irish in America

Henry Ford Jones' book, first published in 1915 by Princeton University, is a classic in its field. It covers the history of the Scotch-Irish from the first settlement in Ulster to the American Revolutionary period and the foundation of the country.

The ebook is available for download in .mobi (Kindle), .epub (iBooks, etc.) and .pdf formats. For further information on the book and author see details ».

MAILING LIST

letterJoin our mailing list to receive updates on new content on Library, our latest ebooks, and more.

You won't be inundated with emails! — we'll just keep you posted periodically — about once a monthish — on what's happening with the library.