John Duns Scotus

From A Compendium of Irish Biography, 1878

« John Dunlap | Index | Michael Dwyer »

Duns Scotus, John, was born about 1274,[339] if in Ireland, as is probable, either at Downpatrick or Taghmon. He was educated at Oxford, where he became a Fellow, and in 1301 was appointed to the chair of divinity, drawing "upwards of 30,000 students to his lectures." In 1304 he removed to Paris, where he held a celebrated disputation on the doctrine of the Immaculate Conception, in which he answered 200 objections, and "established the doctrine by a cloud of arguments." In Paris he was created Doctor of Divinity, and the divinity schools were committed to his care. Afterwards he removed to Cologne, being escorted into the city in a triumphal car by "nearly all the citizens." His career was cut short by an attack of apoplexy, on 8th November 1308 (aged about 34). His collected works were edited at Lyons in 1639 in 12 vols. folio, by Luke Wadding, his biographer. Duns Scotus was esteemed the chief ornament of the Franciscan order. His writings are principally commentaries on the Scriptures and on Aristotle, with some treatises on grammar, and sermons. He was the head of the Scotists in opposition to the Thomists, or followers of Thomas Aquinas.

Sources

196. Irishmen, Lives of Illustrious and Distinguished, Rev. James Wills, D.D. 6 vols. or 12 parts. Dublin, 1840-'7.

339. Ware, Sir James, Works: Walter Harris. 2 vols. Dublin, 1764.

« John Dunlap | Index | Michael Dwyer »

Search

Featured Book

Popular Rhymes and Sayings of IrelandPopular Rhymes and Sayings of Ireland

In Popular Rhymes and Sayings of Ireland (first published in 1924) John J. Marshall examines the origin of a variety of rhymes and sayings that were at one time in vogue around different parts of the country, including those which he recalled from his own childhood in County Tyrone. Numerous riddles, games and charms are recounted, as well as the traditions of the ‘Wren Boys’ and Christmas Rhymers. Other chapters describe the war cries of prominent Irish septs and the names by which Ireland has been personified in literature over the centuries. The book is also available as a Kindle download.

Featured eBooks

Annals of the Famine in Ireland

Annals of the Famine in Ireland

Annals of the Famine in Ireland, by Asenath Nicholson, still has the power to shock and sadden even though the events described are ever-receding further into the past. When you read, for example, of the poor widowed mother who was caught trying to salvage a few potatoes from her landlord’s field, and what the magistrate discovered in the pot in her cabin, you cannot help but be appalled and distressed.

The ebook is available for download in .mobi (Kindle), .epub (iBooks, etc.) and .pdf formats. For further information on the book and author see details ».

Ireland's Welcome to the Stranger

Ireland’s Welcome to the Stranger

This book, the prequel to Annals of the Famine in Ireland cannot be recommended highly enough to those interested in Irish social history. The author, Mrs Asenath Nicholson, travelled from her native America to assess the condition of the poor in Ireland during the mid 1840s. Refusing the luxury of hotels and first class travel, she stayed at a variety of lodging-houses, and even in the crude cabins of the very poorest. Not to be missed!

The ebook is available for download in .mobi (Kindle), .epub (iBooks, etc.) and .pdf formats. For further information on the book and author see details ».

The Scotch-Irish in America

The Scotch-Irish in America

Henry Ford Jones' book, first published in 1915 by Princeton University, is a classic in its field. It covers the history of the Scotch-Irish from the first settlement in Ulster to the American Revolutionary period and the foundation of the country.

The ebook is available for download in .mobi (Kindle), .epub (iBooks, etc.) and .pdf formats. For further information on the book and author see details ».

Mailing List

letterJoin our mailing list to receive updates on new content on Library, our latest ebooks, and more.

You won’t be inundated with emails! — we'll just keep you posted periodically — about once a monthish — on what's happening with the library.