INDEX (M-R)

McAden, Rev. Hugh, 401.
Macaulay, historian, 155.
MacCallum, ship, 232-234.
McClellan, James, ancestor of Gen. McClellan, 236.
McClure, Rev. David, 275.
McCormick, Cyrus, 529.
McCormick, Samuel, 288.
McCrea, Rev. James, 417.
McDowell, Col. Charles, 508, 509.
McDowell, Major Joseph, 510.
MacGregor, clan, 84, 85.
McGregor, Rev. David, 355.
McGregor, Rev. James, 237.
McGregor, Robert, 244.
McHenry, James, 536.
McIlvaine, Bishop, 412.
McKean, Thomas, 419, 478, 489.
McKee, Rev. Josias, 178.
McKeehan, John, 288.
McKendree, Bishop, 412.
McKinstry, Rev. John, 343.
McKnight, Charles, 440.
McMillan, Rev. John, 452.
McMurphy, John, 237.
McNish, Rev. George, 331.
McPherson, Hon. J. B., 537 n.
McWhorter, Dr., 419.
Madison, James, 440, 442, 443, 517.
Magaw, Col. Robert, 473.
Magill, Rev. Daniel, 380.
Maguire, Conor Roe, 37.
Maguire, Cuconnaught, 11.
Maine, Sir Henry, 54.
Maitland, Prof. F. W., 135.
Manning, Rev. James, founder Brown University, 456.
Mar, Earl of, 91.
Martin, Alexander, 441, 442.
Martin, Gov., 419.
Martin, Luther, 441, 442.
Maryland, Ulster, settlements in, 170, 176, 178, 181, 199;
—religious conditions, 179;
—manufactures, 180
Mather, Rev. Cotton, 193, 221, 292, 339, 341, 347, 350, 398.
Mather, Rev. Increase, 190, 414.
Mecklenburg township, 200.
Mecklenburg Resolves, 474-476
Medes, 44.
Middle Shires of Great Britain, 86.
Miller, Col. James, 245.
Milton, John, 138, 148, 328.
Monk, Gen., 148.
Montgomery, John, 473.
Mooney, James, ethnologist, 220.
Moore, Thomas, 55, 56.
Morgan, L. H., ethnologist, 294.
Morris, Gov. 304.
Motley, John, ancestor of historian, 231.
Mountjoy, see Devonshire.

Neal, D., historian, 106, 110.
Neill, Rev. Henry, 191.
Neilson, Rev. Robert, 191.
Nesbit, Rev. Charles, President Dickinson, 455.
Netherlands, 16.
New England, 165, 189, 193, 212, 214;
—Ulster immigration, 221-248.
Normans in Ireland, 53.
North Carolina, 199, 201, 218.
Norway, 52.
Nova Scotia, 92.
Nutfield (afterwards Londonderry, N. H.), 236, 238.
Nutman, Rev. John, 364.

O'Cahan, 10.
Ochiltree, Lord, 84, 98, 99.
O'Dogherty, rebels, 12, 13, 83;
—seizes Culmore, 14;
—attacks Derry, 14;
—slain, 15.
O'Donnell, Neale, 56.
O'Donnell, Rory, see Tyrconnel.
O'Neill, Hugh, see Tyrone.
O'Neill, Shane, 65.
Orkneys, 96.
Ormonde, Lord Deputy, 147.
Ostend, 16.

Pale, Irish, 53, 72.
Parke, Robert, 270.
Parker, Rev. E. L., historian, 239, 245.
Parthians, 44
Paterson, William, 441, 442.
Patterson, Robert, 288.
Paulet, Sir George, 12;
—attacked, 14;
—killed, 15.
Peace of Westphalia, 156.
Peale, C. W., paints Washington's portrait, 446.
Pemberton, Rev. Ebenezer, 421, 444.
Penhallow, S., historian, 299, 301.
Penn, Gov. John, 308, 311;
—account of Indian atrocities, 319, 322.
Penn, William, 261, 272, 293.
Pennsylvania, 212, 248, 260, 269, 477, 497.
Pennsylvania Line, mutiny of, 526;
—arrest British emissaries, 527.
Pennsylvania railroad, 531.
Perry, Prof. A. L., historian, 232.
Persians, 44.
Peters, Richard, 273.
Peters, Thomas, 500.
Petty, Sir William, statistician, 152.
Philip II. of Spain, 9.
Picts, 80, 91.
Pierson, Rev. John, 362, 424.
Piracy, 93-97, 207.
Plunkett, Col. Richard, 145.
Poland, 44, 74, 92.
Pollard, William, 500.
Pope, Gregory, XIII., 9.
Population of colonies, 210, 265.
Pownall, Gov., 231.
Presbyterianism,
—significance of term, 328;
—checked in New England, 338-359;
—favors scholarship, 413;
—promotes popular education, 276, 289, 415, 535.
Presbyterian church in Ulster,
—its strict discipline, 108, 109, 158;
—attitude to liberty, 139, 157;
—growth, 151;
—suffers under Charles II., 154;
comparative statistics, 161.
Presbyterian church in U. S., origin, 329-337, 360-372, 531;
—expansion, 378-400.
Presbyterian ministers of Ulster, early arrivals, 103;
—accept episcopal ordination, 111, 328;
—repress fanaticism, 113;
—separate from Established Church, 129;
—refuse to swear allegiance to Commonwealth, 148;
—ejected from benefices, 154;
—active against James II., 155;
—privy censures, 159;
—attempt to emigrate, 165;
—penal legislation against, 187;
—removing to America, 188;
—settling in America, 199;
—arrivals in New England, 330;
—in Pennsylvania, 331;
—reproached for levity, 350;
—their number in America, 372; see also, Ulster.
Presidents of the United States, their racial origins, 538.
Princeton University,
—early history, 421-446;
—educational influence, 447-457;
—its national character, 440;
—graduates in public life, 441, 442, 443, 445;
—Nassau Hall pillaged, 445.
Proud, R., historian, 315.
Pumroy, Rev. Samuel, 364.
Puritans, influence in Ulster, 106, 110;
—emigration to New England, 210, 524;
—characteristics 326-388.
Putnam, Gen., 494.
Pynnar, Nicholas, 117, 119, 122.

Quakers, their pacificism, 302;
—neglect of public defense, 314;
—Indian policy, 316-323.

Raleigh, Sir Walter, 21.
Ralston, David, 288.
Randolph, Edward, complains of Scotch commerce, 169.
Randolph, Edmund, 442.
Read, George, signer, 419.
Reed, Joseph, mentioned, 313, 441;
—early career, 479;
—in Pennsylvania Assembly, 480;
—cooperates with Mifflin and Thomson, 482;
—on demoralization of army, 496;
—advises attack on Hessians at Trenton, 499;
—reconnoisance at Princeton, 500;
—report on captures made, 501.
Reid, Col. George, 245.
Reid, J. S., historian, 105, 141, 145, 146, 151, 160.
Reid, Whitelaw, 538.
Religious liberty, 138.
Rice, Rev. David, 451.
Robert, brigantine, 230, 236.
Robin, Abbe, 485.
Robinson, John, 288.
Robinson, Rev. William, 382, 417.
Rochambeau, Count de, 485.
Rodgers, John, 418.
Rogers, Major Robert, 244.
Romans, 43, 44, 51.
Rome, church of, 68-71, 161.
Roosevelt, T., historian, 523.
Route Presbytery, 191.
Rowland, Rev. John, 417, 421.
Rush, Benjamin, 419, 441.
Rush, Judge Jacob, 441.
Russia, 76, 92.
Rutledge, John, 536.

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The Scotch-Irish in America cover

There ain’t nothing like the real thing — get the softcover second edition to read The Scotch-Irish in America at your leisure and help support this free Irish library. The author, Henry Jones Ford had this to say about the book:

“This book tells the story of the Ulster Plantation and of the influences that formed the character of the people. The causes are traced that led to the great migration from Ulster and the Scotch-Irish settlements in America are described. The recital of their experiences involves an account of frontier manners and customs, and of collisions with the Indian tribes. The influence of the Scotch-Irish settlements upon American institutions is traced, particularly in organizing and propagating the Presbyterian Church, in spreading popular education, and in promoting the movement for American national independence. In conclusion, there is an appreciation of the Ulster contribution to American nationality.”


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