South-wall Lighthouse, Dublin

After passing the Custom-House, the Liffey is confined by a handsome and solid stone causeway on either side—called the North Wall and the South Wall—erected for the purpose of keeping the channel free from the sands which accumulate on the flat shores of the bay at the embouchure of the river. The SOUTH WALL runs in a straight line into the bay, a distance of nearly three and a half miles; at the extremity of it is a fine LIGHTHOUSE. The North Wall, which is not quite one mile in length, has also at its terminus a lighthouse, but of much smaller dimensions than the other. A few years ago the North Wall was a lonely and unfrequented place, but since the establishment of the "City of Dublin Steam Company's" packets between Dublin and Liverpool, and the building of their warehouses, it has become one of the busiest localities in the city, from whence immense quantities of horned cattle, sheep, and pigs, are daily shipped for England by the company's steamers.

South-wall Lighthouse, Dublin

South-wall Lighthouse (with Howth hill in the distance)


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