CHAPTER X.

From Irish Pictures Drawn with Pen and Pencil Richard Lovett

« Previous Page | Book Contents | Next Page »

THE GIANT'S CAUSEWAY AND THE MOURNE MOUNTAINS

THE Giant's Causeway is the only part of Ireland which rivals Killarney in wide-spread fame and in general popularity. The traveller who has reached Belfast by the rapid and comfortable express train on the Great Northern Railway, or who has come from Fleetwood direct by boat, has two routes open to him; direct by rail, or along what is called the Coast Drive. Should he come by the shortest sea-route, viz., from Stranraer to Larne, at the latter place he is already one stage on the journey. If time presses, the quickest route is by the Belfast and Northern Counties Railway to Portrush. But if the weather be fine and time no great object, by far the best, and for the lover of the beautiful the most enjoyable route is to follow the Coast Road from Larne to the Causeway.

Chimney Tops, Giant's Causeway
Chimney Tops, Giant's Causeway

Portrush, only a few miles north of Coleraine, is a fashionable and popular sea-side resort. It is connected with the Causeway by an electric tramway, the first built in the United Kingdom. This is worked from Bushmills, and has been planned so as to enable visitors to enjoy as much as possible of the fine coast scenery which is passed during the ride. The line begins to ascend very soon after leaving Portrush, and splendid views over the coast and the ocean are obtained. At a distance of three and a half miles, the first 'lion' of the district appears, Dunluce Castle, the ancient stronghold of the M'Quillans. It is an extremely picturesque ruin, standing upon the very verge of a cliff which rises high above the sea, and which is connected with the mainland only by an arch forming a path about eighteen inches wide. The cluster of gables, walls, arches and towers, all in a decidedly ruinous condition, is most effective; and it is well to be content with the distant view. Closer inspection adds nothing to the charm as a compensation for the nervous excitement of crossing the narrow arch.

« Previous Page | Book Contents | Next Page »


Library Ireland Facebook