CONNEMARA...continued

From Irish Pictures Drawn with Pen and Pencil Richard Lovett

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Lough Mask is about nine miles long and four wide, in a very beautiful part of the country, abounding in traces of ruined castles and churches. The river connecting the two lakes runs partly underground, and we are able to give an engraving of one part of this subterranean channel where it is easily accessible and widens out into what is known as the ' Pigeon Hole.' The lively Celtic imagination, which has produced all over Ireland such a rich crop of fairy lore and local legends, has enriched the stream with a brace of holy white trout, which it would be impious in the extreme to catch.

Outlet of Lough Mask
Outlet of Lough Mask

And now, turning our course westwards, one of the most picturesque regions of Connaught lies before us. It is the fashion to rush this district by aid of tourist cars. It is hardly needful to say that a more leisurely progress, even if it lead to the expense of private cars, will soon repay the traveller for the expenditure of time and money. The first half of the 47 miles that separate Clifden from Galway are not particularly interesting; but when Oughterard and Lough Shindilla is reached, the excursion becomes one to delight the lover of fine scenery. To the north rise the Mamturk Mountains, 2,000 feet high; then comes the valley known as Glen Inagh, at the entrance to which stands the huge sentinel, Lissoughter, 1,314 feet high. From the summit of this hill a superb view is obtained over Glen Inagh, Lough Inagh and the wild mountain road to the north-west leading to Kylemore. The chief feature in the view, however, is the cluster of mountain peaks to the north-west, the celebrated Pins of Bunnabeola.

Pins of Bunnabeola
Pins of Bunnabeola

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