THE SHANNON...continued

From Irish Pictures Drawn with Pen and Pencil Richard Lovett

« Previous Page | Start of Chapter | Book Contents | Next Page »

Athlone Castle
Athlone Castle

Two miles below Lough Ree the Shannon flows past Athlone, one of the most important and noted of Irish inland towns. It is a busy market town, a great military centre, possessing also a valuable salmon fishery. The main line of rail between Dublin and Galway here crosses the Shannon by a handsome 'bowstring and lattice' iron swivel bridge. This is 560 feet long, has four spans, two of 175 feet each over the river, and two of 40 feet each, over a road on each bank. The castle is supposed to date from King John's time, and is still well kept up, being an important and imposing structure. Adjoining it are barracks capable of accommodating a small army. Athlone was the scene of stirring adventures in 1641, and in 1691 it was besieged and captured by General Ginkell. The bulk of the town lies opposite the castle, and on the left bank of the Shannon. The famous old bridge, the scene of many a conflict, was taken down some years ago, and replaced by the handsome and convenient structure depicted in the engraving. Athlone is not well built, nor does it contain much that need delay the visitor. But there is an air of bustle and prosperity about it that presents a pleasing contrast with some not very distant neighbours.

« Previous Page | Start of Chapter | Book Contents | Next Page »


Library Ireland Facebook