REVOLUTION AND REBELLION: NOTES

Taken from A History of Ireland by Eleanor Hull

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[1] Pieces of Irish History (1807), p. 196, and Madden, United Irishmen (1842), ii, 245 ; the examination of McNevin took place on August 7, 1798.

[2] The Constitution of the United Irishmen in 1791, in Plowden, History, ii, Appendix lxxxv, p. 171.

[3] Madden, United Irishmen (1842), i, 170.

[4] See the memorandum of a conversation with Lord Edward FitzGerald, ibid., i, 171-177.

[5] Madden, op. cit., 205-214, 225-228; Memoirs of Theobald Wolfe Tone, by his son (1827), i, 158-59; Lecky, Ireland in the Eighteenth Century, iii, 466-472.

[6] Sir Richard Musgrave, History of the Rebellion, p. 54.

[7] F. Hardy, Life of Lord Charlemont, ii, 35-36 ; and see the "Report of the Committee on Orange Institutions," Edinburgh Review, January, 1836.

[8] Examination of Arthur O'Connor, 1798, in Madden, United Irishmen(1858), ii, 319.

[9] Memoirs of Theobald Wolfe Tone, by his son (1827), i, 34, 64.

[10] Tone believed that two-thirds of the Navy was composed of Irishmen, but he probably overstates the number.

[11] Letter to his mother, October 30, 1792, in Moore's Memoirs of Lord Edward FitzGerald (1897), p. 128.

[12] The true parentage of Pamela has been much disputed. Her name is entered in the marriage register as Stephanie Caroline Simms, daughter of William Berkley and Mary Simms. She is said to be of Fago in the Island of Newfoundland. See Dict. Nat. Biography; Moore's Memoirs of Lord Edward FitzGerald (1897), 139, 389.

[13] Memoirs of Theobald Wolfe Tone, ii, 143.

[14] General Smith to Pelham, December 30, 1796; Camden to Portland, January 3, 1797.

[15] Memoirs, ii, 145.

[16] Beresford Correspondence, ii, 142, 145.

[17] Information given to the Government by Edward Smith (alias Bird).

[18] Lord Dunfermline, Memoir of Sir Ralph Abercromby (1861), pp. 74-77.

[19] Memoir of Sir Ralph Abercromby, p. 84, December 28, 1797.

[20] Ibid., p. 85.

[21] Ibid., p. 86, Abercromby to Pelham, January 23, 1798.

[22] Ibid., p. 93 (order issued February 26, 1798).

[23] Ibid., p. 110, dated from Dublin Castle, April 23, 1798.

[24] The military order was issued at Cork on May 7, 1798, by Sir James Stuart, ibid., pp. 122-123.

[25] Cornwallis to Portland, July 8, 1798, in Cornwallis Correspondence, ii, 358, 360.

[26] Cornwallis to Major-General Ross, ibid., ii, 363.

[27] Cornwallis to the same, July 24, 1798, ibid., ii, 371.

[28] Curran's speech on this occasion is preserved in W. H. Curran, Life of John Philpot Curran (1819) ii, 69-113; many of his speeches in defence of State prisoners were suppressed.

[29] Murphy's narrative is given by Madden, United Irishmen (1842), i, 254-367.

[30] Personal Recollections of Lord Cloncurry (1849), pp. 153-154.

[31] Gordon, Rector of Killegny, History of Ireland (1803), 259-260.

[32] Memoirs of Theobald Wolfe Tone, ii, 339, and cf., ii, 272-275.

[33] Memoirs of Theobald Wolfe Tone, ii, 362-365.

[34] Ibid., i, 64.

[35] Idealised in Thomas Moore's beautiful and pathetic song "She is far from the land where her young hero sleeps." Sarah married two years after her lover's death.

[36] For Emmet's Life see Madden, United Irishmen, and O'Donoghue's Life ; W. H. Curran's Life of P. J. Curran. A romance on the subject by Stephen L. Gwynn embodies the historical material.

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