JAMES II's IRISH CAMPAIGN: NOTES

Taken from A History of Ireland by Eleanor Hull

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[1] Macariae Excidium, pp. 42-45; and see J. T. Gilbert, A Jacobite Narrative of the War in Ireland, 1688-1691 (1892), p. 63; C. Leslie, Answer to a book entitled, The State of the Protestants in Ireland, (1692), pp. 7, 8.

[2] Negotiations de M. le Comte d'Avaux en Irlande, 1689-90 (1860). This correspondence gives an almost daily report of events in Ireland from the French point of view. It was privately printed by the English Foreign Office; and cf. Macarice Excidium, p. 45.

[3] Rev. George Walker, The Siege of Londonderry, ed. P. Dwyer (1893).

[4] G. Story, Impartial History of the Wars in Ireland (1693), pp. 27-31, 35-39.

[5] Macariae Excidium, p. 40-41.

[6] Ibid. p. 47.

[7] J. S. Clarke, Life of James II, edited from the King's own Memoirs, ii, 373.

[8] Story op. cit., p. 88; Harris, History of William of Orange (1749), p. 271; C. Leslie, op. cit., Appendix No. 21, p. 71.

[9] J. T. Gilbert, A Jacobite Narrative of the War in Ireland, 1688-1691 p. 105.

[10] J. T. Gilbert, op. cit., p. 109.

[11] Memoirs of the Duke of Berwick (1779), i, 95.

[12] Ibid., i, pp. 95-96.

[13] After the capitulation of Limerick, Luttrell received 2,000 crowns from the Prince of Orange, with his elder brother's estate; but he met his reward in 1717, when he was assassinated by some unknown hand in the streets of Dublin.

[14] Macariae Excidium, p. 69; Contemporary Diary of the Siege of Limerick, by Colonel Richard, 1691, in Gilbert, op. cit., Appendix No. XV, pp. 282-298.

[15] J. Dalrymple, Memoirs of Great Britain and Ireland, iii, p. 42.

[16] French official account from a Government Journal of October 17th, 1690, edited by J. C. O'Callaghan. For a similar expression of opinion by the French generals, see J. Bramhill, The Rawdon Papers (1819), p. 347.

[17] George Story, Impartial History of the Wars in Ireland (1693), p. 103; for the general history of these wars see, besides the references given, J. S. Clarke's James II, vol. ii; J. Bramhill, Rawdon Papers (1819); Sir John Dalrymple, Memoirs of Great Britain and Ireland (1790), vols. ii, iii; Harris, History of William of Orange (1749).

[18] C. O'Kelly, Macariae Excidium, p. 111.

[19] J. S. Clarke, Life of James II (1816), edited from the King's own memoirs, ii, p. 454.

[20] G. Story, Continuation of the Impartial History of the Wars in Ireland (1690), p. 132.

[21] G. Story, op. cit., p. 133.

[22] Tyrconnel believed that he died of poison. G. Story, op. cit., p. 187.

[23] Poems of David O'Bruadair, in a poem popularly known as "The Shipwreck" (Irish Texts Society, vol. xviii), iii, 165-181. For Baldearg and his Rapparees, see Charles O'Kelly, Macariae Excidium (1850), pp. 125 seq.; 141-143; Story, Impartial History of the Wars in Ireland (1693), pp. 152-153. Baldearg was ambitious to revive the title of Earl of Tyrconnel in his own person, which may explain the Viceroy's jealousy of him, as the actual holder of the title.

[24] C. O'Kelly, op. cit., pp. 96-97.

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