CROMWELL IN IRELAND: NOTES

Taken from A History of Ireland by Eleanor Hull

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[1] Letters and Speeches of Oliver Cromwell, ed. C. H. Firth (1904), vol. i, No. CV, pp. 468-469.

[2] "Life and Times of Anthony à Wood," in Athenae Oxoniensis (1815), pp. xix-xx.

[3] Letters of Cromwell, vol. i, No. CV, p. 469.

[4] Owen Roe had witnessed the awful sack of Tirlemont before he closed the gates of Arras ; he had himself threatened to sack Kilkenny.

[5] Carte, Ormond, iii, 477.

[6] Ludlow, Memoirs, ed. C. H. Firth (1894), i, 234.

[7] Letters of Cromwell, vol. i, No. CV, p. 470.

[8] Letters of Cromwell, ii, p. 8.

[9] Thurloe Papers, iii, p. 497.

[10] John Morley, Oliver Cromwell (1904), pp. 311-312.

[11] Letters of Cromwell, vol. i, No. CX, p. 493.

[12] Letter written from Ross, October 25, 1649, Letters of Cromwell, vol. i, No. CXII, pp. 495-496.

[13] Letter to Lord Jermyn from Clonmel, November 30, 1649.

[14] Gilbert, Contemporary History, ii, 64.

[15] Colonel Henry O'Neill was a son of Owen Roe. For his treatment by Coote. See Gilbert, Contemporary History, ii, pp. 88-89 ; iii. p. 214.

[16] Letters of Cromwell, vol. i, No. CXIII, p. 498. and No. LXV, p. 506.

[17] State Letters of Roger Boyle, Earl of Orrery (1742), p. 12.

[18] Whitelock, Memorials of English Affairs (1732), p. 457, col. I.

[19] Cromwell's Report to Lenthal, 19th December, 1649, in Gilbert, Contemporary History, ii, 341-342 ; 467-468.

[20] Lady Fanshawe, Memoir, pp, 92 seq. In London the plague reached its climax in 1665, about fifteen years later.

[21] "Doubling ordinances" were the fashion of the day, and were ready means of raising money by speculation. In the Restoration Settlement these "Doubling ordinances" were struck out. Cal. S. P. I., 1660-62, Intro., p. xv.

[22] The Earl of Cork to the Speaker of the House of Commons in England, August 25, 1642. State Letters of Roger Boyle, Earl of Orrery (1742), p. 5. Lismore Papers, 2 series, vol. v, pp. 98-107.

[23] Lynch, who lived through this period and who dedicates his book in fulsome language to Charles II, distinguishes between the Puritans and Protestants or Anglicans. He says: "The Puritans had no regard to laws of humanity or respect of treaties; the Protestants had some regard for mercy and plighted faith." (Cambrensis Eversus (ed. M. Kelly, 1848), iii, 201).

[24] The Acts relating to the Settlement will be found in Scobell, Acts and Ordinances, ii, 197 (cap. 13), 210 (cap. 23 seq.), 235, 240, 252.

[25] Prendergast, Ireland from the Restoration to the Revolution (1887), p 98, n.

[26] Sir Vincent Gookin, The Case of Transplanting the Irish Vindicated (1655).

[27] "Political Anatomy of Ireland," a work written in 1672, in Collection of Tracts (1861), ii. 18.

[28] Prendergast, Cromwellian Settlement (1865), Appendix VI, pp. 237 seq.

[29] Prendergast, Ireland from the Restoration to the Revolution (1887); Thurloe Papers, iv, pp. 23-24; 41 ; 46.

[30] True Way to render Ireland Happy and Secure, addressed to the Hon. Robert Molesworth (Dublin, 1697).

[31] Memoirs of Roger Boyle, Earl of Orrery (1742), p. 20.

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