FROM AN OLD POEM WRITTEN IN THE YEAR 1822

From The Story of Belfast by Mary Lowry (circa 1913)

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An Amphitheatre more grand,

Graces no part of Europe's land—
Where Neptune's elbow intervenes

To help the variegated scenes.

And over all the Hill of Caves,

With what a bold majestic pride

As if it heaven and earth defied,

The Fort looks o'er the space between,

To hills of yellow, red and green,

Even to old Scotia's craggy hills,

Chequered with sheep, cascades and rills,

To Carrick strongly fortified,

Defying French, and wind and tide,

And to Slieve Donard's airy height,

Which bounds the wearying southern height,

—Like Nature's beautified demesne.—

Those waving hills—that chequered plain,—

Thanks to thy stars, thou Queen of Towns,

Confirmed success thy labour crowns.

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